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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
to introduce to you as he escorts ms. annette young smith to the stage. this lady, ladies and gentlemen, is a lifetime achievement award winner. please, please welcome her to the stage. (applause) >> i can't think of a more deserving woman. thank you. come on in. jeffery, i love you. >> i love you, too. >> hello, neighbors. good evening. you know, first i have to say that i "heart" the portola, i really do. [laughter] >> this is an amazing win frankly for the whole southeast sector, from progress park down, and it's a wonderful night. great to be here with all of you. my name is jeffery betcher. i am the executive director of the organization that emerged 10 years ago from annette young smith and carl page's work on the block where i live. annette lived across the street from me and started planting flowers here or there around the block. and that changed everything mysteriously. and we figured out over time what it was that really created the change, and it wasn't the garden. it wasn't the plants. it was that annette was unafraid to cross the street and give a hug to someone she didn't
side's michael finney. >> reporter: annette smith of rockland and the sacramento air aria needed to pay for maul repairs and registration on her truck. she didn't have the money so went to h her bank wells fargo. they wouldn't give her a traditional loan but suggested she might want to utilize a wells program called direct deposit advance. >> i didn't have to have collateral or a credit check and i felt that that was a good service, you know. >> reporter: are wells fargo let per borrow up to $500. the catch? high had to tie the loan to her monthly direct deposit from social security. as soon as the next check was deposited they he would automatically debit the full loan amount plus a fee of 37-point the $50. >> my only alternative was to borrow again. >> i don't know how much money annette makes every month but her social security check is her only source of income so that is around a thousand dollars. the loan amount, $500. the fee about $37.50. that leaves her just $462.50 for food, rent and utilities for the rest of the month. >> andre leuketta is with the california reinvestment coa
name's annette miller and i'm 32 from louisville, tennessee. when i was 19 years old i became ill with ulcer colitis very seriously. i went through several months of very difficult treatments. a lot of medications. >> 6'2". i've always been a big guy and brought on secondary complications. sleep apnea, which my girlfriend is not too happy about. prehypertension, which my doctor is not too happy about. >> you're too fat followed me into adulthood and i didn't realize how much it held me back until now. >> after 25 years i'm working with the colorado department of corrections and i get to retire on october 1st. >> 13 months ago, i went into sudden cardiac arrest at the notre dame/southern cal football game. little did i know on that brisk october day my life would change forever. >> my one sister had to have a kidney transplant. i was not tested or considered to be a donor because of my weight. >> i was down for 52 minutes and shocked nine times en route to the hospital. >> there is a little 10-year-old kid in here who still wants to play and still be a part of something. be a part
day loan, 91%. annette smith of rockland needed to pay for smog repairs and registration on her truck. she didn't have the money, so they she twont her bank. now, the bank won't give her a traditional loan but suggested that she might want to use a wells program called direct deposit advance. >> i zrnt to have collateral. i didn't have to have a credit check. and i felt that that was a good service. you know? >> wells fargo let her borrow up to $500. she had to die to it her monthly direct deposit from social security. as soon as the next check was deposited wells would debit the amount you plus a fee of $37.50. >> only alternative was to borrow, again. >> i don't know how much money she makes every month but the social security check is her only source of income. so that is around a thousand dollars. the loan amount? $500, the fee about $37.50. that means there is a $462.50 for food, rent, utilities for the rest of the month. andre luke yetta. >> you can't make other expenses taking on another loan that. cycle goes on and on. >> this cycle repeated the following month and month after
. >> reporter: annette nance- holt's only child, blair, was 16. more than 2300 people have been killed by guns in chicago in the years that followed. >> do you think the public is indifferent? >> i think a lot of people are indifferent because they figure it didn't happen to them or they figure most of our kids in our community are gangbangers or drug dealers, don't go to school, are uneducated, don't have fathers or mothers. i think a lot of people look at us like that. and that's not true. when my son was murdered, i got a letter in the mail, it wasn't a week later. somebody found out where i lived. they mailed me a letter saying, had somebody on the bus been armed, if everybody on the bus had a gun, had been armed, my son would be alive. no, i think a lot of the people on the bus would be dead today. >> reporter: following her son's death, nance-holt co- founded "purpose over pain," an organization that advocates for gun control. last week she met with vice president biden's task force on gun violence. what is the something that we have to do? >>
, jr., holiday, we get perspective from presidential historians richard norton smith, annette gordon reed, and beverly gage. >> brown: and we close with the words of a student poet, inspired by the second inaugural to write and perform her work, "change." >> like martin luther king i still have a dream that this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its eed and bring the people a new breed change. the mounting death toll in algeria now includes three americans. that, and other important stories, will be at the end of the program tonight. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you.
. gupta. how are you? >> i'm great, annette. how are you? >> i'm fantastic this morning. >> i wanted to say surprise, welcome, and congratulations. we have already picked you. surprise and welcome to our team. >> really? >> we've selected you. we're very excited. how are you feeling? you all right? >> i am. i'm so overwhelmed and so excited and a little terrified, but it's going to be great. >> we have already picked you -- >> oh, yay! oh, my gosh. you surprised me. i thought i was hearing background noise. >> i get that a lot. i'm often referred to as background noise. >> how are you feeling? >> my heart jumped a little bit. not enough to make it go off. >> that would be bad. >> okay. i can talk now. >> looking forward to the journey. but you know, just looking forward to this being one step. >> how are you feeling? >> you got me. >> throughout the training, these guys are going to experience a complete lifestyle change. more exercise, better nutrition, and take a healthier mental state overall. it's a total life transformation that happened to me when i started training. and i'm ex
in the heart of san francisco. good evening, i'm annette. breaking news on the peninsula after two people, including a two-year-old child, were shot in menlo park. the victims were at a mcdonald's in east palo alto. don knapp picks up the story from there. don. >> reporter: we're on willow road. this is where the shooting occurred. probably the traffic lights of the intersection. as we understand it, two vehicles were at the intersection, an altercation ensued, a gun reached out the window and started firing into the other vehicle, quite a few shots were fired and right now, we can hear from the commander to tell us what happened. >> at this point, the two victims are at stanford hospital, they're in stable condition. my understanding is that the injuries to the child are wounds to the legs and a graze to the head. the mother is also wounds to the legs. they are all in stable condition. they are nonlife threatening injuries at this time. >> as we understand it, the shooting occurred here and the victim's vehicle drove like mad over to the east palo alto area where the mcdonald's is and
this evening with the look at the oscar oscar nominations, and annette insdorf of columbia university. >> the genius of the movie is an amazing interplay between tony kirschner, one of the most brilliantly verbal writers in any media. he can write speeches and arguments and conversations and spielberg is a master of a kind of visual impactful, you know, just making the pictures tell the story and deliver the emotions and i think those things work together so that while it was, you know, sometimes very, very talkie and almost stagy it had speed berg, spielberg moments where it delivered the feelings with enormous power and force. >> rose: lena dunham, and oscar nominations when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. the late, great late nora ever frons says i try to write parts for women for women that are actually tt inreing. >> she has done some of that. her work brings to light the confusion, quantity disand excitement of being a young woman. she catapul
're joined by three presidential historians: annette gordon-reed of harvard university, richard norton smith of george mason university, and beverly gage of yale university. and let me start with you. all kinds of history was out there today. right? >> absolutely brown: what echos did you hear in the president's speech? >> i was very, very much struck by his use of the declaration of independence, the words about all men are created equal to make the case for a comor collective vision of what we're supposed to do so in america. his linking with the pursuit of happiness and liberty which is typically thought of as something that is individualistic. the echos of a community, ideas of people working together were very, very strong. i thought it was surprising in a way because he's not a president who often invokes the founders. certainly not by name. this was very, very much on his mind. >> brown: beverly, what jumped out at you? >> i think we a lot of historic occasions being marked here so we had the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's speech in washington. we have the 150th anniversary
because of annette gordon reed and others we've come to see that the weight is not as disproportionate. >> gavin: promise made, promise kept. >> promise kept. the only people freed in jefferson's will were hemmingses. >> gavin: why the art of power? >> you know this because you've been in the arena. the art of power is the ability to project an ideal, to inspire people to reach a certain place but the capacity to make it real as real as possible. there are two different skill sets being the visionary and orator is one thing and a tactician is another. most people are one or the other. the greatest leaders are the ones who can do both. jefferson was the first figure in the american leadership class to do that. >> gavin: a dreamer and a doer. a philosopher and a maneuverer. >> he knew his way around a committee room. he knew his way around a legislative assembly floor. he knew his way around the presidency. it was an ongoing unfolding education. it started in the 1760s when he was a college opportunity and he was listening to patrick henry and jefferson said henry seemed to speak as home
infants in the u.s. dr. jon lapook reports. and annette nance-holts' only son was killed with a gun. >> mothers and fathers who lost their children to violence raise up and say something now. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley.
the president after the connecticut shooting were in the audience for the announcement, and so was annette nance-holt whose son blair was shot down on a chicago city bus. >> blair did good and today the president did that. >> reporter: the president said change will not happen without help from the public. he urged gun owners to pressure the nra and their lawmakers to support new gun laws. jane weaver represents the second amendment sisters. she says new laws are a knee-jerk reaction. >> let's pass a regulation and then everybody feels better. >> reporter: the nra says it will fight most of the president's proposal, but there is common ground when it comes to expanding background checks. >> background checks at the gun shows. that, as i say, was something we discussed with the atf years ago and we said we didn't have a problem with that. >> reporter: several republican lawmakers released statements saying they will oppose any new gun laws. danielle nottingham, cbs news, the white house. >>> following days of soaking rain this morning the southeast is now in store
go. (concerned mother) 17:48:34 it's some place whereei really feel terrible my son beingannette collins son is 25 years old. he's been locked up at the detention center ffr about a month. (concerned mmther) an annmal in a situation like ttht none the less a juvenile...(joy))7:51:28 as it stands now yoong offenders charged as an adult are housed here at the detention center. and one thing everyone can agree oo is that the (shorten??//sec djs/abed) re 17:34:13 we have to improve those conditions leaving youth in those conditions are simply not our priority we have to change that circumstance for phose kids :23 for years, thee state planned to build a jail in the city for young offenders charged as an adult. but that ppan hhs now be scraped. opposition that resulted in protests and arrests.(shorten if 17:18:06 is another xample off what can happen when reasonable minds put their heads together to nstead, the state plans o renovate a pmaller existing facility bed tteatment (maynard) f a 60 17:32::6 treaament space in bbltimore city orryouth in baltimore cityylan may have lit
, brought to you by provida life sciences-- practical solutions for better living. >> i'm annette, i'm from studio city, california. i'm a mother of three, i weight 155-1/2 pounds. this is the heaviest i've ever been. i'm a size 10. ...and this is me now! i lost 25 pounds and went from that size 10 to this size 2 in just 12 weeks. how did i do it? i became a food lover. >> i'm a food lover and i lost 36 pounds. >> i'm a food lover and i've lost 50 pounds. >> i'm a food lover and i lost 60 pounds. >> i'm a food lover and i lost 82 pounds in eight months. >> what if you could actually lose weight eating bread, pasta, sweets, even wine and chocolate? when you're a food lover, there are no forbidden foods. >> i don't have to deprive myself of anything. i can have wine, i can have chocolate. i can have pasta, i can have bread. i can eat all my favorite foods and lose weight-- i've done it. >> all of the things that helped me to get so big are now helping me to lose weight. >> i tell everybody it's the best diet i've never been on. >> sound too good to be true? i thought so. but then i found out
and tracks your money. annette has more tonight from sacramento. >>reporter: if you have a cell phone or 7 utility bills for electricity gas or cable then you pay a laundry list of fee and surcharges that go to the state public utility commission. new scathing audit by the california department of finance rips how the commission is poorly tracking ultimately spending those moneys that go into 14 special funds to pay for things like phone service for the disabled. >> as rate payers and taxpayers we want to assure the amounts that we are paying in these rates are for their intended purposes. that they can be accounted for properly both the revenue and the expenditures. >>reporter: auditors found wide spread budget error. general confusion. lack of knowledge led to the reporting of 400 million dollars that actually didn't exist and poor tax collecting technique led for false service for rural area n.one incident a worker committed an 81 million dollar typo. >> just lousy bookkeeping going on. >>reporter: state senator hill has been pressuring the state p uc for years to change what he ca
for education certainly. annette has more now from sacramento governor brown says the budget deficit has been wiped out. and per pupil spending will go up almost 2700 dollars by 2016 under controversial proposal to give schools more money if they have higher numbers of low income and non-english speaking students. >> growing up in compton or richmond is not like it is to grow up in los gatos or beverly history or piedmont. >>reporter: higher education will see bump of 2000 dollars or so per student in the same time period. all thanks to rebounding economy and california voters for approving the tax hike under proposition 30 last november. >> they voted for the tax measure. putting money natural schools as i said but we are also not going to play the game of spending money we didn't vishtion the budget plan includes 1 billion dollar rainy day fund while democrat like the blue print proposal also drew cautious praise from republic kaichbilitys i think the governor deserves credit for advance ago budget plan that gemly imposes fiscal restraint when we need it. >>reporter: some were disappoi
of the emancipation proclamation, we turn to annette gordon-reed, an historian and professor of law at harvard law school. she won the 2009 pulitzer prize in history for her book, "the hemingses of monticello: an american family." of the professor freed, we just saw a long line snaking around the national archive. the event is one thing. how come an object has that kind of power? >> well, it's an iconic document in american history. and americans like to look at things like that to remind us the sort of journey we've been on from the beginning of the country's foundation. the declaration of independence, the emancipation proclamation, are the touch stouns for where we have been and where we hope we are going. >> suarez: i have seen people wait an hour to see, in effect, words. if you go to ancient cathedrals in europe, let's say, they may wait in long lines to see objects that connect to saints, kings and queens. are we a republic of words? are they so important that we'll wait a long time to see them? >> well, people have said that america is a country that is founded upon ideals and ideas that a
times", dana stevens of slate and annette insdorf the director of film studies at columbia, and graduate film program there, i am pleased to have all of them here at this table right after we heard the nomination this morning, i think the biggest surprise was captain bigelow didn't get a nomination for "zero dark thirty". >> that was a big surprise. i think you know that although that is a movie that has been hamstrung a little bit by the controversy that has been gathering around it, having -- >> rose: how would you define the controversy? >> well, this is a movie a that on the one hand makes certain claims towards being, you know, not absolutely 100 percent literal but very journalistically accurate portrayal of the last ten years of the war on terror, from september 11th to the -- >> rose: what you are saying is -- >> in particular, there are sequences of torture or water boarding that seem to imply that these techniques of interrogation produced some good intelligence, and that, i think, has made some people very, very upset. some people i think have bonn so far to say that the movie
name is annette nance and my 16-year-old son blair holt was killed in chicago in 2007. >> i witnessed my mother and 12-year-old brother shot and killed in our living room and the next day witnessed my grandfather shoot the next door neighborhood. >> i'm collin goddard, i was shot four times. >> and even before the meeting with those folks, the vice president suggested that the administration is determined to act. >> every once in a while, there's something in the wake of the conscience of the country. and that tragic event like nothing i've seen in my career. so we're here today to deal with a problem that requires immediate action. >> and meanwhile, the state of new york could be moving ahead with legislation of its own. >> this is not taking away people's guns. i own a gun, i own a remmington shotgun, i've hunted, i've shot, that's not what this is about. it is about ending the unnecessary risk of high-capacity assault rifles. >> and laerry, after all of the activity today, representatives of the nra and walmart, which is one of the nation's leading retailers of guns are going to me
in the alienating way they have talked about latinos as annett nick group and as a political constituency, if they can just get mainstream on the issue of reforming the immigration system, just go along with the democrats on this, we'll just hold our nose and do it, there is this myth that then republicans will gain a new constituency of voters who is prepared to vote for them. a new constituency of voters, millions of voters, a growing constituency that agrees with them especially on social conservatism. all these latinos are going to start voting republicans if you can control the downside by having the republicans ease up on immigration. nothing in reality suggests that that is the case about latino voters. but republicans are on the move on immigration right now anyway. at least for now. will they balk once they realize that latinos are going to vote overwhelmingly democratic anyway? i know exactly who i want to ask about this. that's next. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persev
of what we posted. >> yes, it's up on your facebook page. >> stephanie: thank you. annette in chicago. you are on the "stephanie miller show." hi, annette. >> caller: good morning. hey, the thing that totally befuddles me. i grew up in germany that's the country where according to bill maher, the police in the entire country shoots less bullet in a year than the l.a. police shoots in a weekend. i'm not sure where he gets his facts from but people there have health insurance and here you can't -- you know, people don't want to be checked if they want to buy a gun, but if i want to get health insurance, disability insurance, life insurance, i have to go through a background check. >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: it's just that whole backwards thing i really don't get. >> stephanie: yeah, i think to most people -- and that's why at least i'm hartened to hear those statistics that 92% of americans are for background checks. you think is this just common sense? >> caller: absolutely. >> stephanie: since you are in chicago, they said the majority of guns come from mississippi --
by the constitution. >> thank you. thank you. thank you. >> i find it deceitful and -- >> annette speaker, please. -- the next speaker, please. >> i am from santa rosa. nothing we can do today will bring back the lives that were lost at sandy hook elementary school. i am not against hunters. some of my best friend are hunters. hopefully, they have not shot each other yet. god bless them. it was my birthday december 14, 2012. to my knowledge there were not any hunters out there trying to shoot a bag of deer or a pheasant or quail. in newtown. you can go to bushmaster online. i may be wrong on the amount, you can buy one of these awful weapons, of course i am not sure you can use it. i know california has good lollaws against that. we had a national law from 1994-2004. it worked fairly well. it was not perfect. fifth one idea i have seen put out there is that the national guard might be trained. they know local schools. they can get there faster than police can. >> thank you very much. >> thank you for bringing this. i would like to say that america is at war. it is not just in foreign countries. i
this goes back to what annette was saying as well, that it was this real embrace of american exceptionalism to say, something special about the nighted states. that is a signal in this whole debate oop that's going about, is america in decline. look at bill clinton's inaugural he said, well, maybe -- we have to constrain our ambition, that was really his message in the '90s. this is a moree pan sieve vision than that, in ab attempt to be on the side of america. >> is it more that kind of tone rather than specific lines that you think will be remembered? >> i think the tone will be remembered. it depends on how he latches his policy on to what he's saying here. he's going to talk about gun control, he's going to talk about immigration reform then we'll have chance to see if everybody is going to follow along. we can do all of this. i wonder what people -- i know what people in the world any about that when americans go on and on how we are this special place that, the hope of the world. but all of this will depend on what he actually does. melding the policy through the words. >> mark and
as annette bening was one year and you lose to hilary swank. tomorrow night, jessica chastain is the favorite to win best drama actress. jennifer lawrence the best comedy musical actress. basically whoever gebs the best speech tomorrow night will be the oscar winner. >> are golden globes usually good predictors for academy award winners? >> in the performance categories, yes. not for best picture. historically, they did overlap, but in the past eight years, we've only seen the two awards agree twice. >> wow. all right. well, "lincoln" leads i think seven golden globe nominations and then leads with oscars i think 12 nominations. so which movies then have the best chance of, say, upstaging or upsetting "lincoln"? >> i'm looking for "argo" and going out on a limb. support me here because i'm the only one doing it. >> i'm with you. >> are you? okay. ben affleck did not get nominated for best director this week. everyone's saying "lincoln" has this in the bag. there is one case historically of where a movie won best picture without being nominated for best director and it was "driving miss daysy.
mention someone who's not with us today, and that is congressman tom lantos. tom, his wife annette and his staff were mentors to me and all worked so hard on behalf of burma for so many, many years. i wish he were here today to share this moment in history with us, because i think that he would agree today is an amazing day. today is an incredible day. who would have thought that when this bill was introduced in the house in 2008, when aung san suu kyi was still under house arrest, that in a few short years she would be standing -- or sitting -- here with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor? and as a member of the burmese parliament? back then we thought about granting the medal in absentia which may have been the first time a person would have received in the history of the medal, would have received the congressional gold medal while in detention. who would have imagined that this change was possible? who would have thought that this could happen? well, let me tell you who believed that it could come true, and that is aung san suu kyi herself. she might be too humble to admit it, but i
. >> stephanie: annette from baltimore, you're on "the stephanie miller show." >> caller: happy new year. i was calling to let you know i called economic terrorists and and -- even if we vote them in, isn't there a way we can -- like we can impeach a president. especially when we pass the laws like the house law, they did everything they could not to fund it? that was a allow. if we break a law it is some kind of penalty for us. >> thanks to things like citizens united, you can actually support the candidates not inside your congressional district through greater support mechanisms that are going to be out there the next cycle. let's say you're in an area where your democrat congressperson is safe, you have the opportunity now to go after them and i think it's worthwhile. >> chris i don't mean to be quibly. that's the word of the day. but they are a little treasony. pledge to grover norquist. a little treasony. just saying. talking about secession treasony. how about this one. south carolina state representative introd
help. >> stephanie: 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. let's go to annette in detroit. >> caller: good morning, how are you? >> stephanie: good go ahead. >> i have been trying to get in on the conversation for weeks now. but i wanted to suggest a word for you on the article you just read about the kids and gun training. you came up with the word evil. i would like to suggest diabolical. >> stephanie: uh-huh. >> caller: i can't believe they think it is a good idea to teach kids how to shoot. >> stephanie: yeah particularly i think in the wake of newtown, to read these kinds of stories, i was just appalled. >> caller: i can't get over it. i wanted to know if anyone else found it ironic that during the benghazi hearings republicans kept trying to say to secretary clinton, that they wanted to find out what they can do to never let this happen again, but when it comes to gun control they say there is nothing we can do. >> stephanie: exactly. everybody is coming to the table on this, except for the gun lobby. >> that's the evil of power. >> stepha
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)